Power to Sing Live

A solid mixed voice technique is required for a powerful middle and head voice. The Mixed Voice Technique of pulled up Mix is used for a more powerful sound but doesn’t damage the voice like pulled up chest voice.

                                    Hi. It’s Chuck Gilmore with Power to Sing Live. I think this is number 122. How are you? We’re going to talk today about the mixed voice technique, and particularly going to talk about pulled up mix for more powerful sound. This is a question I had today, or this week in my comments section.

                                    So I thought maybe we would talk a little bit about that. Pulled up mix. So really quickly let me just … Hi Sherrie, nice to have you here today. Noona, very nice to have you. Hi Joe. Great to see you. You guys, let me know if I … if you can here me and see me okay, alright? My YouTube … Well it says I’m getting a good stream now, so I think we’re in pretty good shape.

                                    Meanwhile, do you know when you’re singing in a mix voice? Yes or no in the comment section below. “Yeah I know where … I know, yes.” Or, “No I don’t know when I’m singing in a mix.” Just curious about it. Do you know when you’re in a mix singing voice? Just yes or no in the comment section below. It’s a really, sometimes, I think a rather confusing thing, when you’re first learning it particularly. I think maybe we may want to address a little bit of that today. Because, I recall being kind of ambivalent about it, not really knowing exactly how it felt for a number of years when I first started with this particular vocal technique.

                                    But oh my goodness, once I started getting this sense and feel of what mix was, then the whole world changed. Hi everybody. Let me see here. Zachary nice to have you here today. And Bestie, hi. Okay. You don’t know for sure. “Not sure I ever am.” Zachary says, “No.” Noona says, “Yes I think so.”

                                    “Hi from China. Nice to have you here. Your video helped me a lot.” Cool. Thank you very much. I’m really excited to know that. Sherrie says yes. She has a pretty good feel for when she’s singing in mix. This is really vital to us as singers. So I remember in the olden days, I would have my little cassette tape and I would put it in the vehicle I was driving. We had cassette player in both our … We had a big Ford Club Wagon, 12 passenger. I have 8 children, so we loaded them in. And also in my other car that I used for driving to work and so forth. Really for quite a long time, I was always wondering about this mix.

                                    So [inaudible 00:03:28] hi. Nice to have you here. Taylor Hardin. Hi Taylor. “Just subscribed yesterday.” Cool. Yup, you’re just in time. Peter Dakias, nice to have you here. So great to have you guys join us today. If you didn’t hear this question, do you know when you’re singing in a mix voice? Can you tell whether you’re in mix or not when you’re singing. So just let me know yes or no in the comments below.

                                    So I think I recognize most everybody here today. If you haven’t subscribed, please subscribe. Give me a thumbs up and … thumbs up, subscribe, hit the bell so you get notified when I go live or when I post a video. You may have noticed I haven’t posted for a little while. I’m working on some things and we’ll be back to posting regularly probably within the next week.

                                    So, okay. So let’s kind of get down to it here, right? We’re going to talk about what a mix is, and we’re going to talk about what pulled up mix is, and we’re going to talk about is there another option to try and get a stronger sound. So this was the question, the question to me was, “I have a hard time with my head voice. So it’s just not giving me any power. So can I pull up the mix to get more power?” And the answer is, yes you can. I’m not sure that that’s exactly what you want to do. Because think about it for a minute, if you don’t have a good strong solid head voice, when will you develop that? When will you get your strong solid head voice if you’re always pulling up the mix?

                                    First of all we’re going to talk, what’s mix? Number two is we’re going to talk about what is pulled up mix? Then we’re going to talk about some alternatives maybe to that. But I’ll demonstrate that, or I’ll try and demonstrate it and we can talk more about it.

                                    So Peter says, yeah he does know when he’s in mix. Good for you Peter. That’s awesome. Bestie says, “Can you explain the difference between mix and a powerful falsetto? How is the feeling exactly?”

                                    Well first of all Bestie, I don’t teach falsetto. Falsetto by my definition, is when the tone disconnects.

                                    (singing)

                                    Like a yodel.

                                    (singing)

                                    That part that goes high …

                                    (singing)

                                    … is the falsetto. That’s a disconnected tone. But I’m going to guess you mean a powerful head voice. So we’re going to talk about what’s the difference between what’s the mix and a powerful head voice.

                                    [inaudible 00:06:19] Hi. It’s nice to have you with us today.

                                    Okay. So first of all what is mix? Well in order to mix something together, you have to have at least two things, right? So if you’re baking something and you mix something together … Let’s say you have to have a bowl of flour, and you mix together some water in it. So you’re mixing two things together. That’s the idea behind a mixed voice. There’s two things, at least, that you’re combining together there. And in the case of singing, it’s a mix of the chest voice and a mix of the head voice.

                                    So if I’m singing in my chest …

                                    (singing)

                                    … and I break into falsetto, I’m not going to be able to mix, because I can’t blend with falsetto. I can’t blend falsetto with chest. They don’t blend together.

                                    So if I say …

                                    (singing)

                                    … I’m not mixing, I’m just pulling up the chest voice. So that’s not a mix. If I said …

                                    (singing)

                                    Let me think.

                                    (singing)

                                    If it’s so very light that I don’t have … There’s a big air leak in my voice, so I’ve got a lot of air escaping through the vocal chords, I suppose strictly speaking it could be termed a mix, but what’s it good for? You know, in that situation there’s so much air escaping, there’s so very little chest voice …

                                    (singing)

                                    … that I suppose you probably really couldn’t call that a mix either. If you did, it would be very, very light or breathy, or an airy mix. So your balanced mix, where you’ve got your chest voice, and you blend it with a head voice, would sound more like this.

                                    (singing)           So …

                                    (singing)

                                    This is for the guys. This is the E, F, F Sharp.

                                    (singing)

                                    So that’s a blend of chest and head voice. Now what’s happening is at the E, F, and F Sharp, some of the head voice starts to come in. If I do it right. If I don’t do it right, and I keep pulling chest …

                                    (singing)

:                                   … then I’m not allowing any head voice to come in. If I break into falsetto then I’m not able to mix anything with falsetto. So in order to have that mix, there has to be a split in the vibration in a way. We call it a split vibration. It’s probably not scientifically not exactly accurate, because how do you … you know. If you have a pool of water or a flood of light between one part of the cavity, and another part of the cavity, it’s all one thing. Yet, it’s resonating in two different places. That’s probably the best way to describe it. Or it’s resonating in both places, okay? So we’ve got some chest resonance, or we’ve got some chest vibration, and we’ve got some head vibration and that is your … That’s the way I feel that mix.

:                                   So let me just say that one of the things I want to talk about is how do you actually turn that mix on? So maybe let’s do that right now. It’s really connected in a very simple way, to the vowel. So listen, if I said … as I’m going through the bridge, the “ah” goes to “uh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Can you hear that?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If I don’t …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If I keep trying to say “ah” or the vowel starts to spread, then I start pulling to chest. If I let go completely, I go into falsetto. Or if I am too light and breathy, you know what that is. So a quick way to go into a mix is to not go into falsetto, so you don’t want to break into falsetto, and it’s not to go so very, very breathy or light, but it’s just to modify that vowel, to narrow it slightly.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Oops. I’m in the wrong key.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So now I’m on the G, which is the beginning of men’s head voice. Ladies, what about you? Where does it start for you? Does anybody know? Hey George. Nice to have you with us today. I just asked the question, do you know when you’re singing in mix? If you do, let me know, yes or no, in the comments. Just, “Yes. I know.” Or “No. I don’t know when I’m in mix.” So we’re talking about mix today, and we’re talking about pulled up mix. Right now I’m defining what mix is.

:                                   So ladies, A, B Flat, B, C, C Sharp, those are … The C Sharp all the way through the first bridge. In the bridge is where your … That A, right here … is where your mix beings. That’s the mix of chest and the mix of head voice. Now a lot of us, all of us guys or girls, tend to bring that chest voice too high. That’s one of my concerns about pulled up mix. Because I’m worried … because I haven’t heard this … I’ve never heard this particular singer try this, but I’m worried that the reason why his he’d voice is so light or weaker, he doesn’t have any power in it, is because he’s pulling up chest too high, and he’s never really gotten into an actual mix so that he can keep taking the mix coordination and transitioning into head on the way up.

:                                   So I’ll illustrate that. I get worried … So ladies, let me finish this first. A, B Flat, B, C is where you begin the mix. So if I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Breaking into the falsetto.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Let’s see, so that’s pulling up the chest. If I don’t flip into falsetto and just keep pulling …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And keep going, you’ve heard that before, right? Or, if I’m just too breathy/airy …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   … I don’t have any chest, really, to mix in. So I guess that’s really the answer there. So what you start to do there at the A is the same thing that I just showed you where the guys start doing at the E.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Should have stayed in the key. But here’s the A.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And I’m not great at illustrating in your register, but if you want to try that on the “ah” and just slightly narrow it, “ah” to “uh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And see if you can feel that start to go up above the roof of the mouth. It starts to balloon a little bit. Kind of opens up again in that area there. You start to feel some resonance happening there.

:                                   Good. George says he is aware of his mix. Awesome you guys. So Bestie says, “You said we can’t pass our bridge with pushing and/or with our chest voice. Then how do the singers belt them?” Many singers belt by pulling the chest voice, yeah. So we can’t pass the bridge pushing or pulling chest, Bestie, and mix. Okay? That’s what I hopefully … Maybe I misspoke that. But if I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Yup, I’m pulling the chest voice higher. But I can’t mix when I’m pulling just chest, because there’s no head voice coming in. So if I keep pulling chest higher and higher, I just have to yell harder and harder. Unfortunately, that’s what happens when some people try and belt it. They’re just yelling the chest voice higher, and they’ll never get into a mix, never get into head voice. They’ll have to crack and break into falsetto, which is disconnected tone.

                                    So if I kept pulling the chest voice higher, whether it’s in the girl’s register, or my register …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I break into falsetto. And how often have you heard that in both men and women’s voices? Now the ladies can kind of get away with it, but us guys, we can’t. We just can’t sing that way. Well I mean I guess it depends on the genre. I can’t sing that way on stage. Nobody would take me seriously. Right? Hey Zack. Nice to have you here.

:                                   “Now that you mentioned it, I might be able to tell now.” Okay. Good. So hopefully this is helping a little bit. Have you tried that ladies?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   “Ah” to “uh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Or guys down here?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   “Ah” to “uh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Now the interesting thing about head voice is just staying the same condition. You don’t change anything.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You’re in that place. You just got through the bridge, and you keep the same coordination. Now let’s talk about what’s pulled up mix. What do you think pulled up mix would be? Well if I said … Let’s just say I did it on “nay, nay, nay” for a second.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Or let’s see. I’m going to get in the key of G.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   What is that? It’s not pulled chest.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It’s not falsetto.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It’s not strictly head voice. And so, it’s gotta be a mix. Even though it’s a little bit on that witchy side. Let’s say I do it now, instead of saying …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   But if I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Then you hear some of the condition of that breadier, witchy-er sound in that “no”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Well, what is that? I wouldn’t say that’s head voice. I would say I’m pulling mix up. It’s not pull up chest.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It’s not falsetto.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So if it’s not mix, if it’s not falsetto, it’s not head voice, and it’s not pulled up chest then it’s gotta be some kind of a mix. So … If I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I wouldn’t say that’s just pure head voice. In the head register for sure, but you hear all that, the bottom, in that sound, and it’s a harder, edgier, cutting sound. So it’s not pulled up chest, it’s not falsetto, it’s not just pure head voice. So I would say it’s mix that was pulled higher and higher. So if I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Sorry. Got some stuff on the … Embrace the phlegm right?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If anything, I would say that pulled up mix certainly is more … It’s got a lot of … Well I don’t know how you would describe it. I would say it’s probably definitely louder and so forth, and maybe has more bite to it. Maybe it’s kind of a more R&B kind of feel. Let me take a couple comments here, what do you think? Joe says … Okay, Bestie says, “It really sounds like head voice to me.”

:                                   Well it doesn’t feel like head voice. Let me see if I can … okay. Let me see if I can illustrate the difference. Let me see if I can do it. I don’t know. I never really tried it. If I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I would say, for me, that’s …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Now. Let me see if I can illustrate more of a pulled up mix kind of feel.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So, for me, that’s more of a pulled up mix. It’s a little bit different than …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Can you hear the difference? There’s more of the … I guess it would be a little bit more of a pharyngeal kind of presence in that. Okay. Let’s see. Joe says, “I can keep it from breaking into falsetto, but I can’t get rid of the crack completely as you do.”

:                                   I understand that Joe. There’s probably … We would have to take a look at your voice individually and see what’s going on. Now, there’s a difference between feeling the transition and a complete crack. So if you’re not breaking into falsetto completely, you’re probably just feeling a little road bump there that’s the transition. That actually can smooth out over time. It did for me. I used to remember feeling all the time being able to …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I’d feel like in the middle there. I’d feel kind of that … I don’t feel it anymore. So in time you can eliminate it. But if the larynx is coming up …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If it’s the larynx coming up, and it does break, then of course you’re going to feel it. It’s possible that it’s breaking and reconnecting on the way up too. Usually it’s because the larynx is too high. Almost always. In some way.

:                                   Okay, so … Or there’s a little bit of reach in it. Joe says, “I also break where you do.” Right, I think if I remember, your bridge is … You’re more of a contralto. The deeper voice? Am I right Joe? Okay. Jovie Gold. Hi. Nice to have you here Jovie. So if you didn’t hear the question, do you know when you’re in your mix? Yes or no? Let me know in the section below.

:                                   All right, so that pulled up mix is a harder sound. I think it’s more of an R&B or gospel kind of sound. Maybe an edgier rock and so forth. But you know, I think it’s still a little bit less than necessarily optimal. So we’ll talk a little bit about maybe what’s an option here. The other option would be just to develop your head voice. So we’ll take that in a second.

:                                   Zachary asks, “How do we know if the larynx is too high?” Zach, if you break on the way up, the larynx is coming up. So, if I had a … I don’t know if I can do this today or not, but let me just show you the difference in sound for a second. If I said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   One is the larynx is up, the other is the larynx is down. So usually it’s … You feel it if there’s some kind of a reach. If you feel like you’re going into swallowing mode where the larynx really starts to travel up, usually you can’t hit your upper notes. And you also can’t hit the lower notes. If the larynx is up, it’s hard to get the low notes together.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So mine’s in pretty good shape today. But I … If there’s a little bit of … Yeah so, it’s different, it’s not where you speak. Now I should say Zach, that there are singers, students that have come in, and they talk with a high larynx. The larynx is up. I think mine was too for most of my life. And just through the last several years, I’ve noticed it dropping and the sound got deeper and so forth. Part of it is I’m aging. That’s another aspect of it.

:                                   So indications that the larynx is too high. Number one is you’re breaking into falsetto, or you’re pulling a chest voice up.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If the vowel spreads wide, the larynx is going to come up. So if I’m singing …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So if you noticed that the vowel is changing from what you would normally just speak to something that’s spreading open …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Or

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You know, if the vowel is changing, the larynx is coming up. Trust me. So those are indications that the larynx is going up. You don’t want that to happen. We don’t talk that way. So another way to measure it is, where does it rest when you speak? How does it feel when you speak? That’s where it should be. That’s what we want to have happen when we sing. Which leads me to … Oh let me take a couple more comments.

:                                   Jovie says, “I go off key now and then. Which kind of practice should I do, please? This gives me a headache.”

:                                   Jovie, there isn’t necessarily any scales that … Well here’s the question. Do you go off pitch when you go to the bridge of the voice, or do you go off pitch in that you can’t find the pitch at all. So if I played this note …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Are you able to hit that note? Or this note?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Can you hit those notes? Do you go off pitch only as you go higher as you approach the bridge?

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s the question. Let me know the answer to that, and then I’ll respond.

:                                   Bestie says, “Yeah. That’s mix I think. But when you sing, how do you fastly transition to your voice/chest mix? Imagine you’re singing around the G4, A4 or C5. How do you do it without cracks or other weaker sounds?”

:                                   So Bestie, what you’ve got to practice is keeping the larynx down. So one exercise for that everybody, would be to say … To do kind of a … If you put your hand here on your Adam’s apple, and Bestie, you probably have to kind of put your finger in there and feel that lump, it’s about mid neck. If you swallow, you can feel it move up. It goes up and that’s what we don’t want to do. We don’t want to go into swallowing mode while we sing. So if you put your hand there on your Adam’s apple and say … “duh” not just, “duh” but “duh”, you can feel it drop. So you can do exercises with that kind of imposed larynx just to start retraining the larynx to stay down. Now we don’t sing that way, but the exercises help condition the larynx to stay a little bit lower.

:                                   So you start to feel that you don’t have to raise the larynx in order to sing higher. So one exercise would be a “gee” sound like this …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   With that dopey sound.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If you put your hand here on your Adam’s apple you can feel that with that dopey sound, it pulls it down, and don’t let it go up during those exercises.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You just keep that in position, and that starts to retrain the larynx from going up. So when you’re singing and you’re starting to learn how to transition, then you go to these longer scales.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s a great way to start practicing the transition. This is an even better way …

:                                   Because my vocal chords are adjusting and I’m going through that bridge, both bridges and coming back down again, and the vocal chords are adjusting nicely. So you know, those are great exercises to learn to adjust or to make the transition. Or the tongue trill. Great, great exercises to develop the speed and agility to adjust from chest through the middle, through your mix, and then to your head voice.

:                                   Now let’s talk about what the alternatives are. Number three, the alternatives to pulling up the mix. We know we don’t want to pull up chest, and you can always pull mix down. That’s okay. It’s never okay to pull chest up. So pulling mix up, I think, is a little bit … You have to really have a handle on mix. Otherwise, you risk the possibility of pulling chest. And if you feel like your going to crack or you do crack, you probably were pulling chest. Or if you feel like the larynx is going up, you’re pulling chest.

:                                   So as an alternative to pulling up the mix voice, is a little bit longer term work and it takes a little bit longer to develop the head voice, because there can’t be any tension in it, there can’t be any reaching in it. Because if there’s a little squeeze on the vocal chords, they’re just not going to function 100%. They’re not going to function as easily as they are when there’s a complete release. There’s no tension in it. There’s no squeeze to the vocal chords. Once we get to the point without that, then the vocal chords start doing their job very nicely.

:                                   So, I’m not sure what condition I’m in today. I haven’t done any vocal warm ups. But if I just said …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s not pulled up mix. I’m just going into head voice.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s the high A. Ladies, that’s your first bridge.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Now, it takes a little while to develop the strength of the head voice. But you get to it not by pulling up mix, that’s not how you develop it. You get to it by working to get a balanced voice throughout the range. So that just takes some time.

:                                   So, how do you do it? And I’ll just say right now, in the description below is the get your vocal type PDF. Getting your vocal type, finding out what your vocal type is will help you to understand what you tend to do when you sing through the bridge, when you’re going into your mix. Just by identifying whether you’re pull chest, high larynx, or whether you’re flip falsetto, or whether you’re light chest/no chest or whether you’re a mix, is going to help you develop that head voice. It’s going to help get your voice in balance.

:                                   So go to the description below. It says, “Get your vocal type.” It’s a PDF. It’s got links to the vocal test. It’s got links to all the videos on each vocal type, and it’s got links to the exercises that you download. So you want to start there. It’s going to help you transition from chest … Bestie, it’s going to help you transition from chest, through the middle, into your head voice, and back down again. It’s going to help you develop the agility to do it quickly. To transition quickly.

:                                   And so, what I’m saying is, is that the alternative to developing your head voice, takes a little bit longer, but it’s really, really rewarding. So, again, I’m not in really excellent … I don’t think I’m in excellent voice today but, just being able to sing up there with strength is, you know, it’s such an advantage. So it starts feeling the same everywhere, no matter whether I’m in the bridge, or I’m in chest really, or whether I’m in head voice.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So that’s about an octave there, and a half. Or an octave and a half tone. So when you start finding that coordination of the head voice, which comes about by just getting this balance in the voice so there’s no squeeze, no tension on it, then the vocal chords can kick in, and you get this depth of chord, and you get this brilliance, and you get this power in your voice. That’s where this whole technique takes you. Being able to develop a mix, and then transitioning into head voice without tension, without reaching up, without the larynx coming up, and over time you develop that quality of singing, where no matter where you’re at, it feels the same.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It’s the same thing. There’s no reach in it.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So that’s where everything is headed. And its so possible, you guys. I know, because there was a time I couldn’t sing any higher than this.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I was 43 before I learned that it was possible to go higher. I had no idea I could do that. Hi Daniel. Nice to have you here today. I want to say hi to … Oh and Anna Lou. Hi. Nice to have you here. “Is belting just a strong mix voice?”

:                                   So Anna Lou, what is the definition of belting? That’s part of the problem here is that some people call pulled up chest belting, and some people have a different name for it. And it really kind of depends on what it sounds like and how they’re producing it. There’s a university in my state here that teaches something called belt. It’s a high larynx mix. It’s supposed to be. The vowels are a little bit more open, a little wider, and I don’t particularly like the sound, because there are a lot of overtones that are missing in the voice. I’ve heard singers on stage doing the belt, and they have two volumes, loud and soft.

:                                   So, you know, I watched one belter singing to another belter and it’s a romantic moment and it’s just loud, loud, loud, loud, loud and soft, soft, soft, soft. So it just didn’t seen to have the dynamic range. Now I’m sure everybody is different. This particular singer couldn’t do that. So it was really, really hard for them to be able to sing …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   To be able to do that loud, soft, soft, loud kind of thing. And that’s what the mix and the head voice does for you. So one definition of a belt is a high larynx mix, with a little more open vowel. A reduction in some of the overtones of the … or more open or more natural voice. So that’s my definition. Okay.

:                                   Let’s see here. I could do … So Bestie says, “I can do most exercise but I can’t do them on songs. I can do most exercise but I can’t do them on songs, like diaphragm or mix.” Well that’s certainly the first step though isn’t it, Bestie? You’ve gotta be able to do them in the exercises. And if you can, you’ll get them. If you’re doing them right, they’ll translate to the songs. If you’re not doing them right, they won’t.

:                                   But here’s the other thing, Bestie, now you get into the words. So the words are changing vowels. You change the vowels and that can get you into … That’s another discussion. That is the management of vowels. We’ll talk more about that at another time.

:                                   John H. says, “Is there an exercise to keep … ” Sorry. I’m missing [Ox J 00:42:08] here. Ox J, hi. Nice to have you here. “Can we learn to mix without learning the basics of singing? Can we learn to mix … ” I couldn’t. You may be able to. But I was not informed enough. I didn’t have enough background. I didn’t have enough understanding of my voice to do that. So for me, no. I don’t know about others. I have met a few people who seem to mix naturally. But they’re natural singers. Born, just have this gift.

:                                   But for people like me, I haven’t met anybody that just figured it out on their own. John H. asks … Hi John, nice to have you here. Those of you who have just joined us, do you know when you’re singing in mix? Yes or no? Let me know in the comments below. Also, be sure and subscribe. Give it a thumbs up if you haven’t subscribed. Thumbs up, subscribe. Hit the bell button. And the other thing I wanted to tell you is if you haven’t gotten your vocal type, get the PDF in the description below to get your vocal type.

:                                   It will take you to the test. The PDF has links to take you to the videos about the vocal types, and it will take you to the exercises. It’s the absolutely first step to getting through your bridge with mix. Okay?

:                                   John says, “Is there an exercise to keep the larynx low?” Yes, John. If you put your hand here on your Adam’s apple and say “duh”, really stupid “duh”. Not just “duh, but “duh”, you should feel it drop. “Duh”. So what you want to do is to take that dopey sound, and do it on “gee”, and then say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Or …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Now if you keep that larynx, that dopey sound going, it’ll go a little hoot-ey.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   If I don’t …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   My larynx is coming up. Or ….

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It might crack or break. So I want to keep that dopey sound.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And that’s helping me practice retraining the nervous system. Keep that larynx down.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And if I say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Larynx is up.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You gotta stay kind of dopey, kind of hoot-ey.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   It’s the best exercise to keep the exercise down. “Gee gee gee” or “goo goo goo”.

:                                   Bestie says, “Wovel or tone is changing when it comes to mix too, right?” I’m not sure what W-O-V-E-L is Bestie. “Tone is changing.” It really shouldn’t. There’s not … It’s resonating. It’s vibrating in a different place, so it may … It’s going to sound a little different. Yeah. The tone is going to … Because it’s vibrating in a different place in the instrument, it’s going to be a little different.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So it’s a pitch difference. There’s not a lot of difference in terms of mechanic.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   But there is a bit of difference in tone, because there’s a vibration moving to a different part of your body. Just like the tone is different down here.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Three octaves, that’s not too bad. Okay, so let me see. Anna Lou, “Is belting just a strong mixed voice?” Okay. We answered that. Daniello … Danny … Dan … Danello. Danello, sorry about that Danello. “Nice exercises.” Thanks. Hey Danello, nice to have you with us today. Great to meet you. “I couldn’t to download the free PDF in your link.”

:                                   It didn’t work? Well I’ll double check it. Thanks for letting me know Danello. So I will double check that link, and I will fix it if it’s broken. Anybody else have trouble with that? Let me know. If someone wants to try that and see if it’s a problem, let me know. Danello can’t get his to download. So I’ll double check it. It would be nice to know if someone else has been successful with it.

:                                   Okay, so we’ve got … [inaudible 00:47:47] says, “What’s my vocal range?” Hey that’s about it today [inaudible 00:47:51]

:                                   That’s the G. So that’s a G2.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Really, for me, I mean I can perform at this …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s the E2. I mean I just vocalized up to the G5. A performance range for me, I’ve performed a song that had a high C in it, the C5. It was just a passing note, but I’ve done that in a performance and I auditioned once with a song that had a B Flat in it. A B Flat 4. But generally speaking, I perform in lower … Maybe anywhere … So my performance range would probably be more like an A Flat, A Flat 4 and down, middle C area and so forth. But that’s the range, is E2 to about G5.

:                                   So Bestie says, “Do you mean pulled up chest exercises? I’ll definitely download them.” They’re not pulled up chest exercises. They are exercises to stop you from pulling up chest, okay? That’s the pulled chest, high larynx. Exercises are to help you not do that and to teach you another way to bridge without having to do that.

:                                   Youthful Combat, hi. Nice to have you. It’s been a while, I haven’t seen you. “Very cool exercises every week. Thank you very much.” Thank you. Thanks for being here. Daniel Mark. Hi Daniel. Nice to have you here. “Are you familiar with singers like Adam Lambert?”

:                                   Yeah. “He’s quite rocky, but he sounds like he’s got a loud mix.” I would say so. “Is this a high larynx mix or … ” You know, I think the guy’s got a gift. That’s a good example of somebody that has a gift. I think he’s probably in his head voice and it’s a real strong head voice. There may be some pulled up mix periodically in it, but he gets up there. He really gets up there. So I would probably say he just has a really solid head voice.

:                                   Aqua Epic. Hey Aqua Epic. Don’t know you, nice to have you here today. “Is there an exercise that helps with fluidity? If you listen to a singer such as Joey Tempest, he does it perfectly. I would like to learn to match that.” I don’t know exactly, Aqua Epic, what you mean by fluidity. But again, this one and a half scale is great, because it takes you from your chest an octave and a half up, to your head voice.

:                                   So if I said … Well if I just did it this way. Probably the best exercise for fluidity that there is. Because it helps you transition, helps the vocal chords make the transition. It balances the voice, keeps the larynx down. And that’s just a great exercise. The tongue trill the same way.

:                                   You can do it faster and faster and faster. Two [chucks 00:51:35]. No. Okay. Maybe this is help then, Two Chucks. It would be nice to know if you’re feeling a little more informed on the mix. So Chris. Hi Chris. Nice to have you here today. “Some mix are more chest full. What can be done to sound a bit less heady when you want to sing a song that is telling a story that should be speech like?”

:                                   When you want to sound a little bit less heady? Yeah Chris, so again, of course, what you want to keep working on is balance, getting balance in the voice so there’s no reaching with it, there’s no larynx coming up and so forth. So we’re not squeezing the vocal chords. You know, it’s helpful to have the low breath, pulling your tummy in when you’re doing the exercises and so forth. So we want to eliminate the tension. We want to eliminate reaching and as we do that more and more, and get to the point where we keep the larynx down, then the rest of the voice starts kicking in, and the head voice starts coming in stronger.

:                                   I would say that’s your longer term solution. When you want to be a little less heady, and you want the song to be a little more spoken, I would say, Chris, that one of the first things I would do, just to get your a little bit more strength … Let’s just say that when you’re doing that, you kind of go into a more of a legit softer sound. More like …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You know? But you want to have more to your voice than that. I would say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So you might want to do an exercise like …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And go a little bit towards that exaggerated sound.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And then maybe …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   But keep a little bit of that condition of the “nay nay” in there.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You know? So that you’re starting to get that same sensibility of that little bit of exaggerated witchy sound into your voice. That’s a quick fix that sometimes can give you what you need to do in a song that’s coming up. But the long term would be to keep working on developing the … you know, your head voice and the mix, and the chest. All of it together. Hope that helps.

:                                   Ox J says, “I think mix requires compression in the vocal chords, and resonance in the pharyngeal region, but I can’t do it practically. Then I sound like a cat moaning. Chuck please do a live chat about compression.”

:                                   So it should be … There is compression. There is compression in our singing, and we’ve got to wrap this up really quickly. Thanks for everyone’s participation today. It’s been real exciting. We’ve got to be able to … There is a compression, but it’s a friendly compression. It’s not a squeezed or pinched compression of the chord structure as the air is passing through. What we find is, by getting the right balance of air with the vocal chords closing around it, the muscle of the vocal chord. By getting it balanced, that’s when the real power sets in. So if I said …

:                                   So again, like I say, if you just need … yeah. So if you think the mix requires compression in the vocal chords, I don’t know that it does require it. A lot of people rely on a little bit more of the compression. Like the “nay nay nay” give a little bit, not really compression, but there’s a little bit more tension in the muscle of the chord. Not tension … Yeah I guess maybe it’s a little bit more compressed. I don’t know what the word is here. I’m drawing a blank. Anyway …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You can certainly do that and start to fill that in. But really, where it comes from is this complete relaxation. It’s a letting go, and kind of pressing into the condition of letting go.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And you start feeling that and think, “Wow that’s a nice strong powerful head voice.” But I just keep reproducing the same thing. I think, “Let go Chuck.” And then press into that. Get a little bit louder into that feel of letting go.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s the F Sharp. Ladies, you’ll find the same thing, the C Sharp, B Flat, B, B Flat, A. The further you are away from the bridge the easier it gets so here’s the F Sharp. It’s a harder one for us guys, because it’s the top of the bridge.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So, an exercise to build your mix, you guys, is to say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And keep the second vowel in the same place the first one was. I didn’t say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   I didn’t do that. That’s pulling up chest.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So leaned heavier, I leaned more … I got louder. I crescendo-d on that narrower place, in that narrower place. I didn’t let it go spreading.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Not like that.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   That’s where you gotta keep that to build that mix.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Not.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Don’t do that.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So I gotta be staying in that same narrower place to build their mix voice. If you go in the chest, you’re just going to build chest. Ox J was able to download the PDF. So Daniel, or Danello, we had someone here who could download it. Try a different browser. I think … Well mine is Chrome. Turn off your computer. You know, reboot the computer after you’re getting off here to see if you can download that. If you can’t leave a comment and I’ll try to figure out another way to get it to you.

:                                   Okay a couple of people are saying the PDF is working. So thanks for checking on that everyone. Okay. We have gone over an hour. What a session today you guys. Thank you very much. I hope this has been helpful in some way. We’re talking about things, you guys, that take some time. It takes some time to learn. It takes some time to begin to feel. It takes some time for the nervous system to accept it. It takes some time to build new muscle memory, and it’s not something that goes by forcing it. That’s what’s the challenge behind this. You can’t just force it. You’ve gotta be patient with it and do things as correctly as possible, and then the right things begin happening.

:                                   Okay, Ox J could download it. So thank you for double checking. Visible, hi. Nice to have you here today. “The vowel modification means that when we’re singing, we have that sing in the high notes with vowel modification. Example “E” to “eh” to eh”. Can you do an example in mix?” So that’s a great question. So if I’m going to modify the vowel, let’s just say if I don’t modify … If I say …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So I’m spreading the vowel.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So I’m going to go from add “eh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So take it from “Can” “ah” to “eh” “Can”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Spread that vowel. “Ah” to “Uh”.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   And on love I don’t let it go to [lave 01:01:22].

:                                   (singing)

:                                   So “la”, “ah” to “uh” …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   … is an example. So it’s not a big modification. It’s just enough to help you stay in your mix.

:                                   (singing)

:                                   Versus …

:                                   (singing)

:                                   You can hear the splatting, splatting, splatting. By taking “ah” to “eh”, “ah” to “uh” those are going to make the difference and it’s going to sound like you sound when you speak them. You don’t say “Can you say the love tonight?” You don’t say that. But that’s how we sing it sometimes.

:                                   Okay. Hope that helps, Visible. Chris says, “This witch sounds helps a lot. It’s a nice switch. This “nay” to “no”, thanks. Or [inaudible 01:02:24].” Yeah. Thank you Joe. Thanks George. Fahad, thank you. Nice to have you here today. Daniel, thanks. Great everybody. Thanks. Love you all. Be sure and subscribe if you haven’t, and thanks for being with me today. This is Chuck Gilmore with Power to Sing Live and remember you can sing higher with beauty, confidence, and power. See you inside the next one.

 

 

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https://www.powertosing.com/GetYourVocalTypePDF

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